Also this is fontina – Sandro Bonin

Also this is fontina - Sandro Bonin

Also this is fontina – Sandro Bonin

Also this is fontina – Sandro Bonin

The picture Also this is fontina – Sandro Bonin has been taken in Pila (Valle d’Aosta) close to the Alpine Pasture; it is a series from the project De la vache à la fontine.
A surreal calm surrounds these places, which resist the changes of time, proudly continuing with their antique traditions. There are two protagonists in the thousand year old history of the Valle d’Aosta tundra: man and cow. The ancient practice of fontina cheese making is passed down from father to son, and still today solitary and silent shepherds show the next generation, who are now mainly Moroccan immigrants, consequently rewriting history into a genuine multi-cultural society, translates them into richness for man and his land.
Working days repeat themselves cyclically during the season when the cows are brought out for mountain pasture for a period that lasts from May to September, while during the winter they rest in the cowsheds placed down in the dales, where a milder climate and a forage based on hay ensure that the cheese gets that unique flavor and nutritional characteristics. When the milking of all cows ends it’s the turn of milk processing; the milk is put in huge copper pots and the rennet is used to thicken it. After 45 minutes in this coagulation process the milk changes status and you can see lots of lumps, like the cottage cheese. Then this lumpy milk is warmed up to 40°C until it becomes a oft cream. This soft dough is then transferred in circular containers in order to be put under pressure and release all liquids left. Then the rounds of cheese are aligned on wood boards to mature in big cellars dug in the mountain rocks.
Hundred liters of milk are used to make a round of fontina, creating a tight relationship like the one between man and cow…de la vache à la fontine.

More pics here

Bianchetta Genovese: the leaf

Bianchetta Genovese: the leaf

Bianchetta Genovese: the leaf

Bianchetta Genovese: the leaf

Bianchetta Genovese is a project that tells about the making of a local wine, whose production is very limited due to the fact that this varietal is nowadays carried on only in two specific areas near by Genova, Valpolcevera and Tigullio.
Coronata is the name of an inner district of Valpolcevera; in this area few old wine producers still in activity are teaching a group of young African refugees the old art of wine making, showing them how to enhance abandoned green areas,and so giving them the chance to transform it into a new job opportunity for the future. This new manpower is therefore working to sprout old vineyard again.
The working process is the same for the two areas: both in Valpolcevera and in Tigullio vineyards require cutting foils and binding  branches, and these operations are alternated with treatments based on sulphur and green copper against mildews and parasitical.
The grapes harvest is the most important moment of the entire working process, and it usually ends with a celebration and a photo memory of all the workers.

More pics here

Bianchetta Genovese: Pan-sotti

Bianchetta Genovese: Pan-sotti

Bianchetta Genovese: Pan-sotti

 Bianchetta Genovese: Pan-sotti

Bianchetta Genovese: Pan-sotti is a special recipe proposed by the chef Davide Cannavino combined with the Bianchetta Genovese produced in Valpolcevera.

Bianchetta Genovese is a project that tells about the making of a local wine, whose production is very limited due to the fact that this varietal is nowadays carried on only in two specific areas near by Genova, Valpolcevera and Tigullio.
Coronata is the name of an inner district of Valpolcevera; in this area few old wine producers still in activity are teaching a group of young African refugees the old art of wine making, showing them how to enhance abandoned green areas,and so giving them the chance to transform it into a new job opportunity for the future. This new manpower is therefore working to sprout old vineyard again.
The working process is the same for the two areas: both in Valpolcevera and in Tigullio vineyards require cutting foils and binding  branches, and these operations are alternated with treatments based on sulphur and green copper against mildews and parasitical.
The grapes harvest is the most important moment of the entire working process, and it usually ends with a celebration and a photo memory of all the workers.

Bianchetta Genovese: diffusing copper green

Bianchetta Genovese: diffusing copper green

Bianchetta Genovese: diffusing copper green

 

Bianchetta Genovese: diffusing copper green

 

Bianchetta Genovese is a project that tells about the making of a local wine, whose production is very limited due to the fact that this varietal is nowadays carried on only in two specific areas near by Genova, Valpolcevera and Tigullio.
Coronata is the name of an inner district of Valpolcevera; in this area few old wine producers still in activity are teaching a group of young African refugees the old art of wine making, showing them how to enhance abandoned green areas,and so giving them the chance to transform it into a new job opportunity for the future. This new manpower is therefore working to sprout old vineyard again.
The working process is the same for the two areas: both in Valpolcevera and in Tigullio vineyards require cutting foils and binding  branches, and these operations are alternated with treatments based on sulphur and green copper against mildews and parasitical.
The grapes harvest is the most important moment of the entire working process, and it usually ends with a celebration and a photo memory of all the workers.

Empty racks at Å

Empty racks at Å

Empty racks at Å

Empty racks at Å

Å is the is the village with the shortest name in the world. Å is a little fisherman village at Lofonten island (Norway).
Empty racks at Å is a picture taken during the project Upstream Cods.

Upstream cods is our way to tell people the story, using pictures, about stockfish and salted cod, how these two products gets fished, prepared and presented to everyone’s table. The meaning of Upstream Cods is to follow the full production chain backwards: we’ll start from Liguria’s festivals and restaurants concerned stockfish and salted cod, going upstream to the Lofoten islands, Norway, where the cods are fished and prepared to be sold to public, as we know it…be sure that we are also going to snoop around on how they are cooked in their native land. And, by the way, will photograph the natural beauty of these remote islands located beyond the Arctic Circle!

More pics here

So, if you’d like to follow us in this adventure, plaese, Like and share this page https://www.facebook.com/UpstreamCods

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