Cormorants in Røst

Cormorants in Røst

Cormorants in Røst

It is not diffcoult to see Cormorants in Røst a medium-to-large seabirds.

They are coastal rather than oceanic birds, and some have colonised inland waters – indeed, the original ancestor of cormorants seems to have been a fresh-water bird, judging from the habitat of the most ancient lineage. They range around the world, except for the central Pacific islands.

All are fish-eaters, dining on small eels, fish, and even water snakes. They dive from the surface, though many species make a characteristic half-jump as they dive, presumably to give themselves a more streamlined entry into the water. Under water they propel themselves with their feet, though some also propel themselves with their wings

Upstream cods is our way to tell people the story, using pictures, about stockfish and salted cod, how these two products gets fished, prepared and presented to everyone’s table.
The meaning of Upstream Cods is to follow the full production chain backwards: we’ll start from Liguria’s festivals and restaurants concerned stockfish and salted cod, going upstream to the Lofoten islands, Norway, where the cods are fished and prepared to be sold to public, as we know it…be sure that we are also going to snoop around on how they are cooked in their native land. And, by the way, will photograph the natural beauty of these remote islands located beyond the Arctic Circle!
So, if you’d like to follow us in this adventure, and you want to follow Upstream Cods project plaese, like and share this page https://www.facebook.com/UpstreamCods

Some pictures are visible here

Upstream Cods at Stockfish festival in Badalucco

Stockfish festival in Badalucco

Stockfish festival in Badalucco

In the last two days Upstream cods staff took some pictures at Stockfish festival in Badalucco. This is the cooking team

The dried cod from Badalucco, is a dish cooked according to an ancient and precious local recipe. The “Stoccafisso” used to be carried by boat to Porto Maurizio and delivered through the mule tracks to Badalucco, which acted as important exchange centre all over the Argentina Valley. A legend tells about Badalucco inhabitants who managed to resist to Saracens attack for long, thanks to a big dried cod stock. This event is commemorated every year, during the Dried-cod Cooking Festival. On the third Sunday of September the whole village lives again the Saracens attack through a popular Stockfish festival in Badalucco called Baucogna.
Upstream cods is our way to tell people the story, using pictures, about stockfish and salted cod, how these two products gets fished, prepared and presented to everyone’s table.
The meaning of Upstream Cods is to follow the full production chain backwards: we’ll start from Liguria’s festivals and restaurants concerned stockfish and salted cod, going upstream to the Lofoten islands, Norway, where the cods are fished and prepared to be sold to public, as we know it…be sure that we are also going to snoop around on how they are cooked in their native land. And, by the way, will photograph the natural beauty of these remote islands located beyond the Arctic Circle!
So, if you’d like to follow us in this adventure, and you want to follow Upstream Cods project plaese, like and share this page https://www.facebook.com/UpstreamCods
Some pictures are visible here

Upstream Cods – Sørvågen Lofoten

Upstream Cods - Sørvågen Lofoten

Upstream Cods – Sørvågen Lofoten

Sørvågen is a fishing village on the island of Moskenesøya in the Lofoten archipelago. It is located in the municipality of Moskenes in Nordland county, Norway. Upstream cods staff was here to discover the Holmen restaurant.
Upstream cods is our way to tell people the story, using pictures, about stockfish and salted cod, how these two products gets fished, prepared and presented to everyone’s table. The meaning of Upstream Cods is to follow the full production chain backwards: we’ll start from Liguria’s festivals and restaurants concerned stockfish and salted cod, going upstream to the Lofoten islands, Norway.
All pictures available here

Are you ready to pick?

barbera

Barbera grape

Barbera is a dark-skinned wine grape variety found in several Italian wine regions, including its native Piedmont, Emilia-Romagna, Puglia, Campania and even the island regions, Sicily and Sardinia. At the turn of the 21st Century, it was Italy’s third most-commonly planted red wine grape, after Sangiovese and Montepulciano. Barbera grapes are used both in blended wines and varietals – the latter are becoming increasingly common as Italy continues its move towards varietal labeling.

Barbera (like so many Italian wine grape varieties) has ancient origins, although it has only been traceably documented since the 17th Century. It was first cited in an official document in 1798, by Count Giuseppe Nuvolone-Pergamo of Scandaluzzo, deputy director of the Società Agraria di Torino (Agrarian Society of Turin). The count is credited with creating the first definitive list of Piedmont’s wine grape varieties. Barbera-based wines were well regarded even then, for their rustic-yet-generous character. They were a favorite among Savoyard army officers, who considered the wine a “sincere companion”, which helped them maintain their courage in battle.

The variety has traveled widely in the past two centuries, landing in Australia, Argentina and California, most likely following Italian migration patterns. It has this in common with Nebbiolo, although Barbera has adapted much more readily to these new environments than its fussy Piedmontese cousin, and is now responsible for wines of high quality in each of these countries. As with Nebbiolo, there is considerable debate over how Barbera is best treated; traditionalists favor longer maceration and less oak, while modernists champion rounder, more approachable styles softened by barrel maturation.

Barbera is the third most widely planted red grape variety in Italy though it is most common in the Asti and Alba regions. Barbera grapes produce rich, red wines with strong fruit flavors and aromas, especially black cherry. Other characteristics of wines made with Barbera grapes include low, mild tannins and high acidity which produces a crisp taste.

Barbera wines are traditionally aged in large casks which impart little oak flavor, but some today are aged in small French oak barrels, leading to strong oak flavors. Aging in smaller casks also imparts more tannins to the Barbera wines. (http://wine-tasting-reviews.com; http://www.wine-searcher.com)

Barbera Wine Profile

FRUIT: Dark Cherry, Dried Strawberry, Plum, Blackberry
OTHER: Violet, Lavender, Dried Leaves, Incense, Vanilla, Nutmeg, Anise
OAK: Yes. Large neutral oak casks.
TANNIN: Low
ACIDITY: High
AGEABILITY: Traditionally enjoyed within 2-4 years.
SYNONYMS & REGIONAL NAMES:
Barbare, Barbera d’Alba, Barbera d’Aosta, Barbera Sarda, Barbera d’Asti, Barbera del Monferrato

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